(Source: dearlywatson)

catceleste:

this one person wrote 38 stories featuring the pairing of dr. carter from e.r. and walter skinner from the x-files in february of 2011 for a total of 2 kudos and 0 comments. this person followed their bliss, critics be damned

(Source: rubyredwisp)

florels:

skiens:

wtf you mean real women have curves? all women are real women

THIS IS IMPORTANT

(Source: giveable)

sophiealdred:

astoldbygengar:

lets just be clear, if you spend the time baking a cake/cookies/brownies, you can eat as many of them as you want and the calories don’t count. you made those calories. you’re their god.

disclaimer: this does not apply to children you have made

(Source: mayadevilou)

clientsfromhell:

Client: Do you do lemonade?

Me: Do we do… lemonade?

Client: Yes, I was told you do that here.

Me: I’m sorry, this is a graphics and print shop.

Client: I know that. I’m not an idiot. 

Me: I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to -  

Client: Look If you can’t lemonade these papers for me then I’ll go somewhere else!

Me: Do you mean… laminate?

shoulderkeyroyalty:

legolas-the-house-elf:

fuks:

holy f

IVE PROBABLY BEEN LAUGHING AT THIS FOR TEN MINUTES STRAIGHT

I STARTED LAUGHING UNCONTROLLABLY ANF MY PARENTS RAN UPSTAIRS THINKING I GOT HURT DNDBJSJDBT

“Potter has done too much for me for me to ever want to shit all over it. I’m never going to say: ‘Don’t ask me questions about that’. I remember reading an interview with Robert Smith from The Cure. Somebody said to him: ‘Why do you still wear all that makeup, don’t you feel a bit past it?’ And he said: ‘There are still 14-year-olds coming to see The Cure for the first time, dressed like that. I’d never want to make them feel silly.’ It’s a similar thing with Potter. People are still discovering those books and films. It would be awful for them to find out the people involved had turned their backs on it. Though sometimes, people do come up and say ‘I loved you in The Woman in Black,’ which is really sweet. That’s them knowing that it matters to me that I’ve done other stuff.”

Daniel Radcliffe for London Magazine (x)

First off, Kudos, Dan Rad. You are such a good guy.

Second. I keep thinking about this. People complain about reboots, part twos, and retellings. But that’s a super egocentric view of stories. Those people are saying—I’ve seen this story. I can’t imagine anything new being said about it. And they’ve forgotten that there are billions of people who have never seen that movie. Some of them haven’t seen it because they are NEW people. They weren’t around when the first one happened. So it’s cool that you don’t want to see the new reboot of some movie you saw in the 80s. But they don’t make movies just for you. They make them for everyone.

Also the current zeitgeist is not the same as it was 20 years ago, 50 years ago, or 100 years ago. That’s why Marie Antoinette with an 80s soundtrack was cool and explained something important about a historic character by using modern cues that are easy to relate to. Clueless as a retelling of Emma was so clever. 10 Things I Hate About You, was an interesting version of Taming of the Shrew. Warm Bodies is the only version of Romeo and Juliet I have ever liked.

One of the most valuable things I learned in college was to examine a text and find multiple, equally valid interpretations. It’s hard to do that on your own quickly—but when you talk to other people and actually are willing to let go of your first idea and see that their ideas can stand along side yours happily? That’s cool. Though on your own you do come back to a movie 10-20 years later and see it quite differently. You’re different. The story you see will be different. Movies may stay the same (ones that are filmed already.) We don’t.

We like stories we know. But being handed a story you know over and over without any change or new insight—gets dull. You begin to suspect the movie producers think you’re kind of dumb. But a person can take that story and tell it a new way. A way that makes the characters more interesting and tell it in a way that turns the whole story on its head. Forcing you to confront a different set of problems.

And frankly—there is always a BETTER way to tell a story. I did not love the first three HP films. Three was better and the ones after improved. But they had some weird moments. I have a day dream that some day someone will make a miniseries with the BBC or Dream Works and they’ll do like 12 episodes for each book. How great would that be?

(via imaginarycircus)

(Source: potterbird)

ehmeegee:

mellowblueness:

VidCon’s agenda went live recently, and I found myself curious about the degree of equal gender* representation – of the conference generally, but especially of the panels. Panels are a platform, literally, given to people perceived as legitimate and qualified to give advice; they’re a quick measure of whose opinions we value on what topics. And the representation of women on these panels is horrifyingly low.

As with everything related to media, representation matters. The lack of women on these panels both reflects and perpetrates a refusal to acknowledge the validity of women’s voices, experiences, and expertise. This is especially dangerous given the statistically young and female demographic who’ll be watching these panels at VidCon. VidCon could be an opportunity to catalyze a shift towards valuing everyone instead of, overwhelmingly, cis white men… But if the People In Charge ever DO decide to live up to that moral obligation, they certainly won’t be doing so at this year’s conference.

Below is a full list of which panels fit into the categories detailed in the above charts. If you don’t feel like reading that entire list, here are a few “highlights”:

  • Of the 4 all-women panels, all 4 of them are heavily gendered: “Beauty Bloggers”; “Women on YouTube”; “Starting A Beauty Channel”; “A Focus on Beauty”
  • Of five panelists, there are 0 women on the “Online Gaming Strategies” panel
  • Of eight panelists, there are 0 women on the “Faceless Channels” panel
  • Of seven panelists, there is 1 woman on the “YouTube and Your Music Career” panel
  • Of eight panelists, there is 1 woman on the “Writing Comedy for YouTube” panel

* a similar report on the representation of POC on VidCon panels will be coming shortly. Spoiler alert: it’s even worse than this one.

FULL LIST OF PANELS**:

Read More

I participated on 4 panels/discussions this year: “Women on YouTube,” “Education + Entertainment: Is it possible?,” “Sexism on YouTube,” and The Brain Scoop Q&A. 

There is a lot that can be changed and improved about the makeup of the panels at a convention as large and far-reaching as VidCon. I understand scheduling is a complicated process, but having the “Women on YouTube” panel occur at the same time as “The Future of Online Video” left a bitter taste in my mouth. While I’m proud to sit on a panel with some of my personal heroes and friends on “Education + Entertainment,” I can’t help but feel a sense of awkwardness at being the only woman up there. My opinions do not represent the entirety of women educators in online video. 

We also run into a frustrating problem with feeling as though we’re preaching to the choir on the “Sexism” and “Women on YT” panels - while those may arguably some of the most important discussions occurring during the convention, we’re not attracting audiences that otherwise wouldn’t be inspired to attend. When I went to ScienceOnline the first 4 hours of the conference was devoted to issues of gender and race representation inequality - so if you didn’t go to any panels you were actively choosing not to participate in the first quarter of the conference. I’m not suggesting we force people to go to a panel they don’t want to - but structuring the timing of these discussions in such a way sends an encouraging message of support from the convention organizers. It is powerful.

Next year, it’d be great to see “Women on YouTube” on the mainstage.  I would love to have a few men participate in the discussion. Let’s not see the ‘Future of Online Video’ represented solely by men. When you ask how you can help women reach a more equal platform, the answer is that you speak up, and you participate. We need your voices. 

filmzapping:

Snowpiercer - 2013

Boon Joon Ho - South Korea

Cinematography: Kyung-pyo Hong

(Source: aubzplaza)

“I don’t want to look back in five years time and think, ‘We could have been magnificent, but I was afraid.’ In 5 years I want to tell of how fear tried to cheat me out of the best thing in life, and I didn’t let it.”
“I want home to be
a calm place where you and me
can make a new We.”
“Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue.”

piratecoves:

poopflow:

people who dry swallow pills go hard as hell and should not be fucked with

i used to dry swallow pills until a searing pain developed in my throat and chest and with the help of the world wide web i found out it burned a hole in my fucking throat please take your pills with water kiddies it’s worth it